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After taking onboard your feedback, we've made our search smarter and easier to use.

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New features can mean the difference between your product being a 'must have' and a 'nothing special'. They can also be an expensive mistake. To help you navigate this difficult terrain, we've brought together 6 articles that will help you turn feature requests into business dynamite.

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In this article we'll look at 4 software options that help you collect and organise feature requests. We'll look at the pros and cons of each option and point you in the direction of useful resources.

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One of the biggest challenges for product managers is working out which feature requests will help your company grow and which will be an expensive mistake.

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Even a polite way of saying no, such as “thanks for your request, but it doesn’t fit our plans” can annoy — and possibly infuriate — customers. We look at your other options.

Joel Spolsky writes that in designing a UI you should ask who is the user? Specifically: are most users casual, occasional users, or are these users who will be spending all of their time using your program? We asked ourselves the same question designing Feature Upvote.

As a software product manager, how should your team prioritise between bug fixes and adding new product features? Back in 2000, Joel Spolsky created the Joel Test, a 12-step list to better code. We'll start here.